The PJRC

The Democracy Journal
Search Site
Get Involved
This form does not yet contain any fields.
    Support the PJRC

    Support the PJRC for continued original analysis on ending the wars, funding domestic priorities and preserving civil liberties.

    Make a contribution to the PJRC now!

    Make a tax-deductible donation of $25 or more and receive an autographed copy of Tom Hayden's newest book!

    Listen Yankee! Why Cuba Matters

    Conferences & Events

    Tom Hayden speaks in Port Huron, MI, in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Port Huron Statement.

    Invite Tom Hayden to speak in your town! 

    March 18, 2015 7:30 PM - Berkeley, California 

    KPFA Presents Tom Hayden @ First Congressional Church 7:30PM with Gloria La Riva

    March 19, 2015 6:30 PM - San Francisco, California 

    Commonwealth Club of California Presents Tom Hayden: Why Cuba Matters

    March 26, 2015 - Ann Arbor, Michigan 

    TBD

    March 29, 2015 3:00 PM - Detroit, Michigan 

    Source Bookstore 

    April 2, 2015 6:30 PM - Brentwood, CA 

    Diesel Bookstore

    April 8, 2015 - Laguna Beach, CA

    Laguna Beach Democratic Club

    April 11, 2015 11:15 AM - Malibu, CA

    Malibu Democratic Club

    April 18-19, 2015 - Los Angeles, CA 

    Los Angeles Times Festival of Books 

    April 29, 2015 7:00 PM - New York, New York

    Barnes & Noble Union Square with Democracy Now's Juan Gonzalez

    May 3, 2015 9:30 AM - Washington, D.C. (Takoma Park, Maryland)

    Busboys & Poets in Takoma Park, Maryland

    May 3, 2015 2:00 PM - Baltimore Maryland

    The Enoch Pratt Library with The Ivy Bookstore

    May 4, 2015 - Miami, Florida

    Books & Books, Coral Gables

    Follow Tom

                    

    Contact Us
    This form does not yet contain any fields.

      The Peace Exchange Bulletin

      Published by Tom Hayden, The Peace Exchange Bulletin is a reader-supported journal, critically following the Pentagon's Long War in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Iraq, as well as the failed U.S. wars on drugs and gangs, and U.S. military responses to nationalism and poverty around the world.

      Tuesday
      Aug182015

      Julian Bond, Our First Obama

      Julian Bond speaking on May 2, 2015 at the MLK Memorial in Washington D.C., commemorating the the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam Peace Movement. (Photo: Ted Lieverman, 2015.)Julian Bond was one of the most prominent and personable leaders who rose out of the student civil rights movement of 1960, the year he was first arrested in an Atlanta sit-in.

      I first met him in a living room of his family home, a setting filled with books and intense conversation about the choices awaiting a new generation turning twenty. Above all was the personal question - what to risk in order to stop the brutal, numbing advance of Jim Crow over black lives.

      Julian was at the center of the handful that formed the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, with its two prongs of direct action and voter registration in the black belt. A "blood oath" was taken among the tiny vanguard to win voting rights in five years or die trying. Deaths did occur but the voting rights protections were achieved; a historic breakthrough that lasted 50 years before it’s undermining by the recent revival of "the New Jim Crow" regime.

      Julian was a threat to the segregationist order from the moment he appeared during the sit-ins. He instinctively knew that the vote would require a new generation of leaders for which to vote. He was elected to the Georgia state house in 1965. His seating was refused, not only because he was black but also because he and SNCC opposed the Vietnam War and the draft, the first young civil rights leaders to do so.

      Democracy prevailed when the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ordered Georgia to restore his democratic election. It was a huge victory for the movement, including the anti-Vietnam war movement as well. Dissent from the war by Muhammad Ali and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. would follow, and a spreading dissent against Vietnam by people of color in the armed services on many bases and brigs. 

      Not only did Julian open a path from protest to politics, he soon became the magnet for all those seeking new national leadership. During the tumultuous democratic convention of 1968, he became a popular vice presidential candidate. Eventually he passed on the option, partly because he was too young, but the myth was born that a "new generation of leadership" was on the rise.

      Julian served two decades in the Georgia legislature, lost a close congressional race to his old friend from SNCC, John Lewis, but held a leading role in the national NAACP for decades to come. He was on the leading edge of every social movement to the moment of his death.

      Despite heart issues, he responded positively to an invitation to speak in Washington at the 50 anniversary of the first national protest march against the war in Vietnam. On May 2nd nearly 1,000 people held vigil under azure blue skies, rolling clouds, and the imposing Martin Luther King Jr. memorial monument to hear Julian give his final speech. It was unforgettable.

      The message to be communicated was that civil rights, equality and peace are indivisible. Julian Bond wanted his audience to keep the memory that he, like his friend dr. King and many others thought of themselves in the passage of time, not only students, scholars or civil rights leaders, but as peace and justice leaders who gave their lives to a cause worth living and dying for.

      Praise and glory to Horace Julian Bond for the days he spent among us.

      Joan Mulholland, Ron Dellums, Tom Hayden and Julian Bond this May in Washington D.C. to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Vietnam Peace Movement. (Photo: Barbara Williams, 2015)

      Friday
      Jul242015

      Climbing A Final Summit

      Something about a mountain draws people toward the heights. It’s daunting, dangerous, requiring one step, or misstep, after another, like any arduous path to a new level, a plateau of reform. When you make it, there’s something majestic in the peaks. The experience is all there in Kerouac’s Dharma Bums.  That’s why I spoke at the Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics on July 9, in mile-high Boulder, Colorado, and again at the Tattered Cover in Denver. Building a social movement through ups and downs is a similar to the process described by Aldo Leopold in “thinking like a mountain."

      Pope Francis suddenly ranks ahead of Governor Jerry Brown among those assembling for this year’s climate summit. The influence of the Pope and his encyclical may greatly sway the California Governor as they share their thoughts together. Their synergy will have an important effect on President Barack Obama - and to a lesser extent Speaker of the House John Boehner and the Republican Congress, in their meetings this September. Pope Francis, President Obama, Gov. Brown and, of course, Speaker Boehner and the Congress are rooted in the realm of the powers and principalities.

      Click to read more ...

      Thursday
      Jul232015

      Tom Hayden and Brentwood Homeowners Get Bulldozed by City Hall

      The Sullivan Canyon stream with bulldozer on top. (Photo by Tom Hayden, 2014)Originally Published by CITYWATCHLA - Iconic 1960s student protest leader and Leftist intellectual Tom Hayden is plotting his next revolution, this time in leafy, serene Brentwood, at an outdoor table at Starbucks. Hayden is on the phone, digging into his deep Rolodex to solicit the help of a hot-shot Beverly Hills real estate agent in his fight to block construction of two giant mansions in bucolic, lost-in-time Sullivan Canyon, not far from where Hayden is now sitting.

      Click to read more ...

      Monday
      Jul132015

      Bioneers Radio Game-Changing Climate Leadership: What Happens In California Doesn’t Stay in California

      TOM HAYDEN, VIEN TRUONG and WADE CROWFOOT

      As the world’s eighth largest economy, California is emerging as the potential game-changer for global climate leadership. Using strategic alliances and smart policies that integrate ecology, economy and justice, these climate leaders show how: Tom Hayden, lifelong activist and former California State Senator; Vien Truong, Environmental Equity Director, Greenlining Institute; Wade Crowfoot, Senior Advisor to Gov. Jerry Brown.

      Wednesday
      Jun172015

      Praised Be!

      Today's papal encyclical, "Praised Be", may be the most important religious teaching to be released in decades. The question is whether its study unleashes a creative leap forward in human understanding of the environment, or a further round of sectarian religious conflicts.

      Click to read more ...

      Tuesday
      May122015

      Pope Francis Calls for Climate Justice

      The coming climate encyclical of Pope Francis, coupled with his visit to Washington D.C., might ensure a global agreement in Paris this December and transform environmentalism into a movement based on social justice. The Pope's message also might ignite a greater spiritual awakening and an opportunity to challenge the foundations of a global order which forces billions of people to survive amidst poverty and pollution.

      Click to read more ...

      Sunday
      May032015

      A Young Generation With Cameras Makes Everything Possible

      BALTIMORE. May 3. As thousands marched through downtown streets here, officials retreated from their nighttime curfew and National Guard occupation. The only question now are where and when another surge of angry protestors will respond to another death at the hands of police, and who will lead us toward a better vision for our cities.

      Click to read more ...

      Monday
      Apr272015

      Hillary & The Peace Movement

      The absence of a powerful Peace Lobby, on the scale of the civil rights, women's and labor lobbies in Washington, leaves a vacuum allowing Hillary Clinton to drift towards neo-conservative military views. Certainly there are admirable peace groups lobbying Washington today, but none compare with the NAACP for African-Americans, MALDEF for Mexican-Americans and immigrants, the NRDC for environmentalists, nor with NOW, the Feminist Majority or the AFL-CIO.

      Click to read more ...

      Monday
      Apr272015

      The Forgotten Power of the Vietnam Protest, 1965-1975

      THE FORGOTTEN POWER OF THE VIETNAM PROTEST, 1965-75 

      By Tom Hayden 

      Submitted to the conference on the "Vietnam War Then and Now, Assessing the Critical Lessons"

      NYU Center, Washington DC, April 29-May 1, 1975  

      The era of protest against Vietnam - 1965-75 - was unique as the emergence of a nationwide peace movement on a scale not seen before in American history. There were previous war resisters, for example, the Society of Friends, the opponents of the Mexican War and the Indian wars, critics of the imperial taking of Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Philippines, and opponents of World War I, numbering in the many thousands. But no peace movement was as large-scale, long lasting, intense, and threatening to the status quo as the protests against the Vietnam War.

      Click to read more ...

      Friday
      Apr242015

      The Alternative to Obama's Trade Deal

      President Obama's recent progressive initiatives - pursuing diplomacy with Iran, opening relations with Cuba, protecting undocumented immigrants, lifting the federal minimum wage, extending Medicaid benefits to millions of uninsured Americans, imposing tough regulations on coal - are facing furious Republican opposition on every front. That's why it's peculiar that he persists in pushing pro-corporate trade agreements over the objections of a majority of Democrats, unions and environmentalists.

      Click to read more ...